Possible scenario

andrew

Caretaker
Staff member
Rebel, Let’s just, for the purpose of discussion, say this old farmer wants to breed a better beagle. He has 10 hounds. So he runs them, and keeping careful notes of each ones performance, after a few weeks he decides that none of them are what he wants. He is looking for a much better rabbit dog. His dogs are OK, but too many faults, long checks, too slow , too fast, etc. so he eliminates all 10. He knows of a breeder who he hears about who has some the best hounds in the world. So he contacts him, and buys a couple of females and a male. After running them awhile, he is pleased. Even when the rabbit makes a sharp turn to left, these hounds never go to long check. They pick it right up, and speed is good, they are healthy with no physical defects so he breeds brother to sisters. As a result of that, he ends up with 12 hounds. As they grow older, he runs them daily keeping notes on each one. He finds that out of the 12, 8 are not as good as the parents. So he culls these, selling them, and concentrates on the 4. Out of the 4, two of them he finds are top rabbit dogs. Now he breeds these back to his original male and females, and so on. I guess the heavy culling is a major reason for the success he is having.
Now at this point, we are talking about how long he has invested? 3 years? The pups have to mature, be run a lot, evaluated very critically over many weeks, even an entire season.
Now with this in mind, is over time, another 3 to 5 years, would I be correct to say he should have fewer and fewer culls?
At some future date, he should have no culls?
This is my theory. How is it in real life, i.e., what is the reality of it turning out that way?
What can you add to this, correction, or extra, to help our understanding?
 
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maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Let’s get real with this. How about the two that have the best running abilities. Have a genetic defect that causes them to have seizures. They rarely interrupt a hunt only happen occasionally. And when they do happen they are discounted as improper feeding causing them and many other excuses. Now we have set the running traits we desire along with the seizures. Many other defects are bred into the hounds the same way. I don’t believe a person that has been around breeding dogs for several years and cannot honestly identify these defects should be giving too much advice on breeding.
 

Poorboy

Active Member
In his book, Willet Randall pointed out that building a strain of beagles takes a lifetime. Mike, I do not believe that there are any fault free beagles out there. What I have encountered, is that 90% of beaglers hide the faults from buyers, even friends. Then when you start linebreeding and it comes to the surface. I am a firm believer that the reason that guys like Randall and Pearson were successful was because they had a place to let a dog be a dog. I see too many people breeding dogs that their dogs spend 90% of their life in a pen. By letting dogs run loose, a lot of the hardest culling takes care of itself. Also, a majority of us are not going to take the time and make the sacrifices necessary to improve the breed, and therefrore should stay away from breeding.
 

andrew

Caretaker
Staff member
I'll be 70 years old this year. I don't have a lifetime anymore to breed a better beagle. I agree with Mr. Randall that it would take a lifetime.
I think my friend Chuck Kerley has the right idea, or at least his original idea was to go watch a dog run, and maybe watch the hound run several times before buying it. And when he bought his young chocolate pups, he knew who was breeding the best hounds so he went to them. For us old guys, that is probably the best approach to building a good pack. No pack will be perfect, but that does not mean we cannot have fun with our imperfect pack.
 

.REBEL

Active Member
Let’s get real with this. How about the two that have the best running abilities. Have a genetic defect that causes them to have seizures. They rarely interrupt a hunt only happen occasionally. And when they do happen they are discounted as improper feeding causing them and many other excuses. Now we have set the running traits we desire along with the seizures. Many other defects are bred into the hounds the same way. I don’t believe a person that has been around breeding dogs for several years and cannot honestly identify these defects should be giving too much advice on breeding.
To start with whom may i ask is giving others advise, that should not, due to their inability to cull viciously and eliminate faults? Only way to stop such practices is share the information with other beaglers..There are those beaglers that continue to not listen to logic, so the fault continues and may skip several generations, but it still exist.We as a group of beaglers need to police our sport of beagleing and bring others attention to those breeders that accept medical faults in their breeding practices, as long as we continue to shield this type of breeding practice, only thing we can do is shield ourselves.This is why a warranty and guarantee needs to be part of the purchasing of beagles, but than you get all types of excuses, why the seller refuses to give a guarantee and warranty on the beagle being sold.
 

.REBEL

Active Member
Rebel, Let’s just, for the purpose of discussion, say this old farmer wants to breed a better beagle. He has 10 hounds. So he runs them, and keeping careful notes of each ones performance, after a few weeks he decides that none of them are what he wants. He is looking for a much better rabbit dog. His dogs are OK, but too many faults, long checks, too slow , too fast, etc. so he eliminates all 10. He knows of a breeder who he hears about who has some the best hounds in the world. So he contacts him, and buys a couple of females and a male. After running them awhile, he is pleased. Even when the rabbit makes a sharp turn to left, these hounds never go to long check. They pick it right up, and speed is good, they are healthy with no physical defects so he breeds brother to sisters. As a result of that, he ends up with 12 hounds. As they grow older, he runs them daily keeping notes on each one. He finds that out of the 12, 8 are not as good as the parents. So he culls these, selling them, and concentrates on the 4. Out of the 4, two of them he finds are top rabbit dogs. Now he breeds these back to his original male and females, and so on. I guess the heavy culling is a major reason for the success he is having.
Now at this point, we are talking about how long he has invested? 3 years? The pups have to mature, be run a lot, evaluated very critically over many weeks, even an entire season.
Now with this in mind, is over time, another 3 to 5 years, would I be correct to say he should have fewer and fewer culls?
At some future date, he should have no culls?
This is my theory. How is it in real life, i.e., what is the reality of it turning out that way?
What can you add to this, correction, or extra, to help our understanding?
From the get go, and you want to eliminate as many years it takes to bring the scum to the top to be culled off.It Takes a large facility and as many hounds the facility can properly take care of, and the larger the facility and larger number of hounds to select from, will eliminate a few years to select your foundation stock, if properly done you are talking five(5) years or more for a small kennel.Once you have culled from all the hounds you have selected to be your foundation stock, now you can concentrate on breeding these hounds to bring to the top the good and bad faults, and any bad medical genetics lurking in these foundation hounds to be culled off, say another five (5) years. Now you are ready to do some serious inbreeding which will show you if you need to cull any adult hounds and pups from these hounds another five (5) years, so now you have 15 years invest and tons of finances involved and you are down to 10 plus or so dogs that matches what you feel is your idea of a rabbit dog.You have pretty well achieved your goal in having some fine hounds in your kennel, so you inbreed intensely keeping an eye out for any bad genetics, that may have jump back many generations, and believe it or not, genetics can jump back much further than you may think, and the average litter takes more after the grandparents that the parents.So here we are with our goal pretty much accomplished, but give it another five (5) years, and NEVER take your eyes off culling, this will continue until your demise , but if you have done your job properly, you know prior to matting up hounds for a litter, their conformation, color, how soon to introduce them to a rabbit, and their mature adult rabbit abilities.
Last let me say this, if you outcross at aytime the chore begins all over again, and if you do not have bad genetics in your hounds you can't get any bad.If i were starting all over again, i would pay more attentionon to the hounds COI than i would a pedigree, and i would research the hound that contributed most to the COI. Sense genetics can jump back many generations, i would want the hound that contributed most to the COI in every aspects of the pedigree.I just turned 76 and no way would i take the journey of attempting to create another line of hounds.
 

maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
In his book, Willet Randall pointed out that building a strain of beagles takes a lifetime. Mike, I do not believe that there are any fault free beagles out there. What I have encountered, is that 90% of beaglers hide the faults from buyers, even friends. Then when you start linebreeding and it comes to the surface. I am a firm believer that the reason that guys like Randall and Pearson were successful was because they had a place to let a dog be a dog. I see too many people breeding dogs that their dogs spend 90% of their life in a pen. By letting dogs run loose, a lot of the hardest culling takes care of itself. Also, a majority of us are not going to take the time and make the sacrifices necessary to improve the breed, and therefrore should stay away from breeding.
I really don’t see much improvement overall in the Beagle during the 40 plus years of observing them myself. A person can select and breed hounds they like and get more consistentcy in the offspring. But as far as improving them I don’t see it.
I agree a hound that is allowed to run free and develop its instincts on its own is hard to match when a person only has limited time to take them a field. Maybe that’s the improvement that has been made. Most of us don’t have places we can let them roam free. Several have running pens that allow more running than the average Beagler can give a hound. To me a back yard Beagler that can take his small pack of hounds and consistently run and harvest rabbits is doing something special. Then if one of these backyard Beaglers can go compete in a trial situation with a hound that gets a tenth as much opportunity to develope as some do then he has got to be doing something right in the breeding pen. I much prefer buying dogs from those that have similar situations to me. My hounds can’t be allowed to roam free. 90% of the time they’re are going to be in a small pen. I need hounds that can please me in that situation. A strain of hounds that must run free to make a rabbit dog won’t work for most Beaglers today. I breed mine to suit myself and will continue to do so. I will sell any surplus pups I get but would highly recommend if you want a guaranteed top rabbit dog go elsewhere to get them because mine don’t all make the grade. But I’m not going to keep brood stock and care for them and then just give my puppies away. $250 a pup hardly pays a person anything for raising their pups. I breed my own because I get better results that way. I don’t inbreed because it makes them retarded.
 
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maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
To start with whom may i ask is giving others advise, that should not, due to their inability to cull viciously and eliminate faults? Only way to stop such practices is share the information with other beaglers..There are those beaglers that continue to not listen to logic, so the fault continues and may skip several generations, but it still exist.We as a group of beaglers need to police our sport of beagleing and bring others attention to those breeders that accept medical faults in their breeding practices, as long as we continue to shield this type of breeding practice, only thing we can do is shield ourselves.This is why a warranty and guarantee needs to be part of the purchasing of beagles, but than you get all types of excuses, why the seller refuses to give a guarantee and warranty on the beagle being sold.
I can only think of one person that ever claimed to have perfect Beagles and no reason to cull them because the genetics in his hounds where so pure there was no bad traits there. I suppose I am the most unlucky person in the world the dogs I have had over the years have had many defects. The ones I hate worst are the ones that show up later in a dogs life. It’s hard for me to believe anyone that has bred many litters at all didn’t experience any of those defects
 

Poorboy

Active Member
I have been battling faults from day one. We have one male, for example, that had running fits as a young dog. We have used him and out of 15 pups, only one has had a running fit. Otherwise this male has many of the traits that we want. I will not cull him, but will not breed back to close to him. I think that today's dogs are more specialized than they used to be. See a lot of breeding for a particular style, tail movement etc instead of just a balanced rabbit dog. I am torn on the inbreeding thing. I have seen its benefit and I have seen the problems it caused. Any strategy is only as good as the individuals that you start with and the ability of the breeder to be honest with their self.
 

maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I have been battling faults from day one. We have one male, for example, that had running fits as a young dog. We have used him and out of 15 pups, only one has had a running fit. Otherwise this male has many of the traits that we want. I will not cull him, but will not breed back to close to him. I think that today's dogs are more specialized than they used to be. See a lot of breeding for a particular style, tail movement etc instead of just a balanced rabbit dog. I am torn on the inbreeding thing. I have seen its benefit and I have seen the problems it caused. Any strategy is only as good as the individuals that you start with and the ability of the breeder to be honest with their self.
There’s an honest example of real breeding. Beagles are a breed all to themselves. I believe all Beagles are related to some extent as long as we stay within the breed it’s not a total out cross of unrelated hounds. Selectively breeding hounds that have the same basic traits you like seems to work fairly well to me in most cases. A few years back we had a litter that produced two red and white males. One of those males suited what I thought a good beagle should run like. Decided to build a pack of them with similar abilities and color we thought it would be neat to have a matching pack. It just so happens that our male was similar to the ugbf style hounds maybe lacking a little foot. Many trialers consider them rejects so it worked good in gathering hounds for my project. I don’t know how everyone else measures success but my way of thinking it has been a successful project we have even produced s few that compete in the ugbf format
 

.REBEL

Active Member
I can only think of one person that ever claimed to have perfect Beagles and no reason to cull them because the genetics in his hounds where so pure there was no bad traits there. I suppose I am the most unlucky person in the world the dogs I have had over the years have had many defects. The ones I hate worst are the ones that show up later in a dogs life. It’s hard for me to believe anyone that has bred many litters at all didn’t experience any of those defects
I experienced many, many defects in choosing my foundation stock, and some defects in choosing my breeding stock, but i eliminated them as they showed their ugly faces, once i purified my genetics, i have not seen any defects in, say 20 years, once again, i say if you have NO bad in your genetics you can't get bad, and those that are willing and have an open mind and 20 years to devote to creating a line of hounds and willing to follow strict rules, i feel i can be of help, but so far, those that should ask questions and follow strict rules to achieve their success, fail to do so and continue to out-cross to failure, each out-cross brings new genetics into the playing field you have to weed through, a never ending battle, you have to stick to what you feel is as close to your expectations as possible, and line breed for your foundation stock and inbreed to form your bloodline of hounds.It is not an over-nite thing.A pedigree is only one portion in choosing the hounds to begin your search for foundation stock, and most have no idea how to read a pedigree, just because it has a lot of red means nothing when it comes to creating a bloodline, but i am wasting my words and time spent, so why should i care, and the older i get the less i care.Breeding animals, especially hounds, is an art not a science, but how to you convince others that have a few years in the sport of beagleing how to achieve their goal, you don't, but the older they get the best they listen and understand, it takes years to bring out the best in a hounds genetics.
So we get to the point, you were talking about me, and the Whitener bloodline and its genetics, but not wanting to name names, and that in its self is one reason we have so many culls in our hounds and those that have hounds, either scared to mention a name of a hounds-man or a bloodline of hounds.Well when you feel like you have a litter of pups you can give others a one year guarantee it will make the type hound they desire, let me and the world know, can you do that, presently, i do not think so? What i can do is give that type guarantee and also guarantee my hounds will dominate any other hound in existence when breed to one of my hounds, why, cause of the COI of my bloodline, can you do that, i do not think so?? Now if you have any other comments about me or my bloodline, i would appreciate it if you would bring it to surface, so we can put it all behind us, now do not be bashful in your comments, i had rather it surface than to be hidden to later surface, it will not harm me in the least, but allow you to vent and get out in the open so it can be eliminate, deal?|?|?|??
 

maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I experienced many, many defects in choosing my foundation stock, and some defects in choosing my breeding stock, but i eliminated them as they showed their ugly faces, once i purified my genetics, i have not seen any defects in, say 20 years, once again, i say if you have NO bad in your genetics you can't get bad, and those that are willing and have an open mind and 20 years to devote to creating a line of hounds and willing to follow strict rules, i feel i can be of help, but so far, those that should ask questions and follow strict rules to achieve their success, fail to do so and continue to out-cross to failure, each out-cross brings new genetics into the playing field you have to weed through, a never ending battle, you have to stick to what you feel is as close to your expectations as possible, and line breed for your foundation stock and inbreed to form your bloodline of hounds.It is not an over-nite thing.A pedigree is only one portion in choosing the hounds to begin your search for foundation stock, and most have no idea how to read a pedigree, just because it has a lot of red means nothing when it comes to creating a bloodline, but i am wasting my words and time spent, so why should i care, and the older i get the less i care.Breeding animals, especially hounds, is an art not a science, but how to you convince others that have a few years in the sport of beagleing how to achieve their goal, you don't, but the older they get the best they listen and understand, it takes years to bring out the best in a hounds genetics.
So we get to the point, you were talking about me, and the Whitener bloodline and its genetics, but not wanting to name names, and that in its self is one reason we have so many culls in our hounds and those that have hounds, either scared to mention a name of a hounds-man or a bloodline of hounds.Well when you feel like you have a litter of pups you can give others a one year guarantee it will make the type hound they desire, let me and the world know, can you do that, presently, i do not think so? What i can do is give that type guarantee and also guarantee my hounds will dominate any other hound in existence when breed to one of my hounds, why, cause of the COI of my bloodline, can you do that, i do not think so?? Now if you have any other comments about me or my bloodline, i would appreciate it if you would bring it to surface, so we can put it all behind us, now do not be bashful in your comments, i had rather it surface than to be hidden to later surface, it will not harm me in the least, but allow you to vent and get out in the open so it can be eliminate, deal?|?|?|??
You are correct. You are the only person I have ever known to be arrogant enough to claim perfection. You are not the one to be pointing fingers and accusing others of not being upfront and clear about what they are talking about. As a matter of fact your misleading of others is obviously a game you enjoy very much. What format do these perfect hounds best fit? And not saying a person can’t enhance certain abilities in a beagle. Please explain what your hounds today do that hounds 50 years ago didn’t. And I suppose anyone that has a different idea of perfection than you would be a failure in your opinion. You know whether we agree with traditional brace breeders or not you must admit they bred the beagle to an extreme that couldn’t have been easy to accomplish.
 

.REBEL

Active Member
You are correct. You are the only person I have ever known to be arrogant enough to claim perfection. You are not the one to be pointing fingers and accusing others of not being upfront and clear about what they are talking about. As a matter of fact your misleading of others is obviously a game you enjoy very much. What format do these perfect hounds best fit? And not saying a person can’t enhance certain abilities in a beagle. Please explain what your hounds today do that hounds 50 years ago didn’t. And I suppose anyone that has a different idea of perfection than you would be a failure in your opinion. You know whether we agree with traditional brace breeders or not you must admit they bred the beagle to an extreme that couldn’t have been easy to accomplish.
Call it want you want, arrogant or what ever, but those that have my bloodline, has not had a bad word to say about them in all the years i have had the Whitener Bloodline. Now in what way am i misleading others about, and i do not point fingers but tell the facts about others, the only problem there is, others have no idea of these people i am telling the facts about, and games are for children, and i am far from being a child! My hounds are rabbit dogs but if you want to categorize them it would be ARHA and Midwestern style.You can't put something into a hound if it is not there, genetically.My hounds are better suited for rabbit hunting than houds were 50 years ago, but how would you know, you do not have nor know anyone that has my bloodline, and you surely have no personal knowledge how hounds were 50 years ago as a whole.I just happen to know about rabbit dogs 50 years ago from involvement with rabbit dogs i saw in action 50 years ago. If what others have is their type perfection of a rabbit dog, so be it, i am not feeding nor housing their beagles, and for the most part i have not ran with their hounds no more than they have ran with mine, so i am not judging others hounds, only my own.Now as for brace hounds, they were breed to trial and not a rabbit hound for hunting and bagging rabbits!! My opinion..but they enjoyed what they did and i am proud they had fun and enjoyed their hounds, as some of us do today!! When you get ready for more explanations let me know, but it just might show your weak points??let it rip!!
 

Poorboy

Active Member
I do not want to get into y'alls conversation, but I do have a question. Rebel, I have studying a few pedigrees that you have posted over the years. You certainly have the highest COI's that I have ever seen. Have you ever experienced birth defects or abnormalities? Everything that I have read, by scientist and genetic experts say that you run a higher risk when you get over 35 percent, some even drop the number to 25 percent.
 

maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Call it want you want, arrogant or what ever, but those that have my bloodline, has not had a bad word to say about them in all the years i have had the Whitener Bloodline. Now in what way am i misleading others about, and i do not point fingers but tell the facts about others, the only problem there is, others have no idea of these people i am telling the facts about, and games are for children, and i am far from being a child! My hounds are rabbit dogs but if you want to categorize them it would be ARHA and Midwestern style.You can't put something into a hound if it is not there, genetically.My hounds are better suited for rabbit hunting than houds were 50 years ago, but how would you know, you do not have nor know anyone that has my bloodline, and you surely have no personal knowledge how hounds were 50 years ago as a whole.I just happen to know about rabbit dogs 50 years ago from involvement with rabbit dogs i saw in action 50 years ago. If what others have is their type perfection of a rabbit dog, so be it, i am not feeding nor housing their beagles, and for the most part i have not ran with their hounds no more than they have ran with mine, so i am not judging others hounds, only my own.Now as for brace hounds, they were breed to trial and not a rabbit hound for hunting and bagging rabbits!! My opinion..but they enjoyed what they did and i am proud they had fun and enjoyed their hounds, as some of us do today!! When you get ready for more explanations let me know, but it just might show your weak points??let it rip!!
Okay since you asked. Why would a person inquire about buying hounds from others when that person has already got a pure strain of their own hounds that are near perfect in their opinion? If you have any of that bloodline left at all they obviously have nothing bad in their genetics why not take a male and mate it to a female and produce some more according to you they can produce nothing but good, right?
 

maokusa

Well-Known Member
Staff member
I have been battling faults from day one. We have one male, for example, that had running fits as a young dog. We have used him and out of 15 pups, only one has had a running fit. Otherwise this male has many of the traits that we want. I will not cull him, but will not breed back to close to him. I think that today's dogs are more specialized than they used to be. See a lot of breeding for a particular style, tail movement etc instead of just a balanced rabbit dog. I am torn on the inbreeding thing. I have seen its benefit and I have seen the problems it caused. Any strategy is only as good as the individuals that you start with and the ability of the breeder to be honest with their self.
I have much the same scenario going on. The male I wanted to focus on had a couple of seizures as a 4 year old. I knew there was a history in his genes for it and had planned to raise granddaughters before breeding back to him. Now with him showing to be a carrier of the bad gene I am thinking Greatgranddaughters might be better. As of now none of his offspring have showed any signs of having seizures. To me it’s a balancing act you have to weigh the good against the bad. He has many desirable traits that would be of benefit to our program but to me it’s obvious if not approached very carefully the bad traits will tear it all down.
 

.REBEL

Active Member
Okay since you asked. Why would a person inquire about buying hounds from others when that person has already got a pure strain of their own hounds that are near perfect in their opinion? If you have any of that bloodline left at all they obviously have nothing bad in their genetics why not take a male and mate it to a female and produce some more according to you they can produce nothing but good, right?
Yes i am inquisitive about others hounds and i have purchased other bloodlines as pups and even adults, to find out they fail to meet my requirements as a rabbit dog.I at one time was thinking of creating another line of rabbit dogs by crossing my line to an Armando female Tri-W Little Jessica out of FTC Armando's Diamond Jim X IFC Armando's Magic Sue, the cross produced some fine hounds one making triple Champion just over a year old and all pups made some fine rabbit dogs, but i could see real quick that it was going to take way to much of me that i was not willing to give of myself to create another line of hounds, so that idea faded after the one litter.I have had Branko hounds that did not show me anything i appreciate in a rabbit dog. I guess the best of all the various bloodlines i have had in my kennel was from Steve Cory of Maine, out of IFC Melanson's Ranger Dan X Daddy Bear's Hannah but i never got a litter out of him cause he was lost, my opinion stolen, when i attended what was suppose to have been a friendly get together in Virginia and run hounds with several other beaglers..i guess it was just as well cause i personally afterwards seen Ranger Dan in action and was not impressed at all. I have always felt there should be hounds that would impress me other than my bloodline, but i personally have not to-date found such, so i have stopped investing in other hounds no matter how much red they have in their pedigree. I have had other, so called top bloodlines in my kennel, but what i created has impressed me more than those,so called top bloodlines of the present and past, so until i witness better i will continue to feel i have created a sure nuff rabbit machine!!
 

andrew

Caretaker
Staff member
The male I wanted to focus on had a couple of seizures as a 4 year old. I knew there was a history in his genes for it and had planned to raise granddaughters before breeding back to him.
This is one of my concerns. I've brought it up before, but regarding a physical defect that does not show up until the hound is 4 or 5 years old. I like the way my VET says it, the pups born to parents with the genes have a tendency to acquire the problem. He wants an out because every pup in that litter may not develop the problem. I would, as you do, worry especially about things like kidney failure. A seizure is in the same category, perhaps? We don't know if it is hereditary, or caused by other things. I'd certainly start questioning whether hereditary if it did not happen until 4 years old. Would it be correct to say if you've bred the dog a few times, and none of his pups have had any problems with seizures, then the cause may not be in the genes? But technically, everything is in the genes, but definitely start to look harder at genetic causes if one of the parents have a problem, and you also observe it in their offspring.
 

andrew

Caretaker
Staff member
Rebel, I see that you are very discriminating about the hounds you watch run. There is nothing wrong with being a tough judge, and I suppose it is because you are looking for very definite traits. In my own case, most hounds that can bring the rabbit around to me, and which I do not see them failing at checks usually can satisfy me. :)
So what specific things (traits, faults, characteristics, etc) do you see in all the hounds you observe that causes you to say you are not impressed with them? BTW, one of the fun things for me is seeing how my hounds will handle a problem. I used to have a rabbit that would climb out on a log over water, and then jump over to another log, and then slip off the log and turn away. I actually observed this, and then watched the dogs puzzle it out and get through it. Not one hound was perfect at it, and not one of them did it flawlessly, but they did work through it, and that was fun to watch. Was I impressed? No, but I was satisfied. They are supposed to work through it no matter what it takes and without quitting.

But at which point do you say that would not be acceptable to you? I am sure there is no simple answer, but it might be interesting to hear your perspective, again, on what impresses you in hound work.

I am aware of the difference between satisfied and impressed and unacceptable. There is a lot of gray in between, and it is different for each of us. :)
 
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Poorboy

Active Member
I had a long conversation with a friend the other day about the difference between being picking and simply discriminating against other bloodlines. You have to be careful to not let yourself become kennel blind because of a need to be right.
 
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